NPR

Congress Takes A Brush To The Budget, Barring Federal Funds For Portraits

President Trump signed the Eliminating Government-funded Oil-painting Act, or EGO Act, into law Tuesday, permanently banning the use of federal funds for painted images of government officials.
A 2017 congressional committee report singled out this picture of Donald Rumsfeld as one example of the high cost of official portraits. Unveiled in 2010, after Rumsfeld's tenure as secretary of defense had ended, this official image — Rumsfeld's second — cost more than $46,000. Source: Washington Post/Getty Images

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

For many elected officials, it's something of a rite of passage: After getting to Capitol Hill, bearing their constituents' hopes and fears on their shoulders, virtually every politician finally decides to take a stand — in front of a painter paid to make their portrait. Some even decide to sit for it.

But either way, for a long time many of those official portraits were paid for by the

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