NPR

Report: Ineffective Treatment Often Prescribed For Lower Back Pain

And the number of sufferers is expected to increase, especially in lower-income countries as people in rural areas move to urban centers and adopt more sedentary lives. So what can help them?
Source: Peter Dazeley/Getty Images

Chances are, you — or someone you know — has suffered from lower back pain.

It can be debilitating. Actually, it's a leading cause of disability globally.

And the number of people with the often chronic condition is likely to increase.

This warning comes via They state that about 540 million people have lower back pain — and they predict that the number will jump as the world's population ages and as populations in lower- and middle-income countries move to urban centers and adopt more sedentary lives.

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from NPR

NPR5 min read
As Employment Rises, African American Transplants Ride Jobs Wave To The South
At a time of low unemployment for African Americans, educated, well-connected professionals are starting new lives in cities such as Charlotte, N.C.
NPR2 min read
American Man Achieves Dream By Reaching Mount Everest Summit, Then Dies
Donald Lynn Cash of Utah achieved his goal of climbing the highest peaks on all seven continents. A traffic jam on Mount Everest may have impeded efforts to carry him down the mountain before he died.
NPR3 min read
These 'Empty Words' Are Full Of Life
The late Uruguayan novelist Mario Levrero was known for his gleeful weirdness. Empty Words follows a writer who tries to cure his block by writing boring nothings — and it's anything but boring.