NPR

From Collards To Maple Syrup, How Your Identity Impacts The Food You Like

When people are reminded of their cultural roots, the food representing that culture tastes better. Scientists could harness that food and identity association to help people eat more healthfully.
If you're Southern, the macaroni and cheese with collard greens may taste better to you than to someone from another culture. Source: Glasshouse Images

Canadian-born psychologist Jay Van Bavel likes Canadian beer.

"I can't say what it is," he says, laughing, "I just love the taste."

When Van Bavel sips a beer from his hometown, there is a feedback between his taste buds and his brain. He's reminded of his Canadian-ness, he feels more Canadian, and Canadian beer tastes better to him than other beers.

So suggests a recent in the , authored by , social psychologist at New York University and his colleagues. The researchers found that the stronger your sense of social

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