STAT

Opinion: On the other side of physician burnout

To battle burnout, I became a part-time doctor, one who still loves the challenge and privilege of taking care of patients.

I’ve watched enough television shows to know what a burned-out physician is supposed to look like: crying in the stairwell, head hanging dejectedly, knees bent; the downward spiral into drugs and alcohol that leads to a near-miss in surgery; or the final, explosive monologue that alienates the doctor in front of patients and peers. A once-solid doctor now broken.

Mine didn’t happen that way. It was far more subtle and insidious, an accretion like the slow and steady drips that build stalagmites.

Drip: Twelve years of hustling at a hectic pace in a private pulmonary and critical care practice covering three busy hospitals and intensive care units, packed

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from STAT

STAT3 min readSociety
Mental Health Care Accounts For A Growing Number Of Private Insurance Claims, Report Finds
Mental health care is accounting for a growing number of private insurance claims, according to a new report.
STAT1 min readWellness
Listen: Drug Pricing Partisanship, Tech’s March Into Health Care, And Tinder For Clinical Trials
Has drug price reform already stalled? How far has tech come in medicine? All that and more on the new episode of our #biotech #podcast, "The Readout LOUD."
STAT4 min readPolitics
In Washington, A Partisan Approach To Lowering Drug Costs Leaves Democrats Doubting Their Own Party Leadership
Even some Democratic lawmakers are questioning Speaker Pelosi’s strategy to couple legislation to lower prescription drug costs with far more contentious Obamacare bills.