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Bishop Michael Curry's Royal Wedding Sermon: Full Text Of 'The Power Of Love'

The presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church delivered a powerful and emotive sermon to those in attendance and millions more watching across the world on embracing the power of love.
Bishop Michael Bruce Curry delivering the sermon during the wedding ceremony of Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and US actress Meghan Markle in St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle. Source: OWEN HUMPHREYS

In a message, which took to church not only those in attendance at the royal wedding of Britain's Prince Harry, 33, and American actress Meghan Markle, 36, on Saturday — but millions watching from across the world — Bishop Michael Bruce Curry preached on the "redemptive power of love."

Curry, the first African-American presiding bishop of the American Episcopal Church encouraged all receiving his message to discover the power of love to make of "this old world a new world."

For many, his impassioned sermon — punctuated with themes of politics, social justice, civil rights and quotes from Martin Luther King Jr. and the controversial Catholic theologian Pierre Teilhard de Chardin — was a highlight of the historic matrimonial ceremony.

There's much to be said about the message delivered at St George's Chapel, Windsor Castle, but we'll let you read it for yourself.

Here's the full transcript of Curry's "The Power of Love" sermon:

And now in the name of our loving, liberating and life-giving God, Father,

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