The Atlantic

Shakespeare's Conservatism

How his politics shaped his art
Source: Matt Dunham / AP

Ira Glass recently admitted that he is not , explaining that Shakespeare's plays are "not relatable [and are] unemotional." This caused a certain amount of incredulity and horror—but ’s Alyssa Rosenberg took the opportunity to that Shakespeare reverence can be deadening. "It does greater honor to Shakespeare to recognize that he was a man rather than a god. We keep him [Shakespeare] alive best by debating his work and the work that others do with it rather than by locking him away to dusty, honored and ultimately

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