NPR

'My Voice Should Be Heard': #MeToo And The Women Of Opera

Three women — a soprano, a mezzo-soprano, and a vice president of opera programming — join NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro for a conversation about harassment and inequity in the opera world.
Mezzo-soprano Aleks Romano performs in Carmen in Concert at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. on April 21, 2018. Source: Shannon Finney

The #MeToo movement has been a cultural reckoning across industries, from Hollywood to restaurants — but one of the oldest that's been affected is classical music. In March, James Levine, a longtime conductor of the Metropolitan Opera in New York City, was fired for allegations of sexual misconduct. And now, centuries-old works from Carmen to Don Giovanni are being challenged for misogynistic plots and themes.

NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro spoke with three women — opera singers Leah Hawkins and Aleks Romano, as well as Kim Witman, vice president of opera and classical programming at Wolf Trap Opera in Virginia — about their experiences and reaction to the #MeToo movement in the opera world. Hear the full conversation at the audio link and read an edited transcript below.

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