Chicago Tribune

Facebook stalking and phone spying: When self-sabotage becomes a quiet addiction

Some behaviors make us our own worst enemy: snooping through a partner's phone, obsessing over Facebook photos of an event you weren't invited to, or digging for information online about an ex.

Some people run from their problems, hoping they will disappear. Or some might even think about a problem so much, they become too paralyzed to make decisions.

"People tell themselves they are just going to think and think until they reach a conclusion," says Alice Boyes, author

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