NPR

Teaching Children To Ask The Big Questions Without Religion

Religion offers answers to big questions about life and death, right and wrong, and who we are. But some unaffiliated parents are finding power in not knowing those answers.
The Freeman family. Source: Courtesy of Nathan Freeman

Emily Freeman, a writer in Montana, grew up unaffiliated to a religion — culturally Jewish on her father's side, a smattering of churchgoing on her mother's. She and her husband Nathan Freeman talked about not identifying as religious — but they didn't really discuss how it would affect their parenting.

"I think we put it in the big basket of things that we figured we had so much time to think about," Emily joked.

But then they had kids, and the kids came home

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