The Atlantic

New Gibbon Species Discovered in a 2,200-Year-Old Royal Chinese Tomb

It’s extinct. Other gibbons might soon join it.
Source: Samuel Turvey / ZSL

When Samuel Turvey found a drawer labelled “gibbon,” he knew he had hit the jackpot. But what he found inside was better than he could have hoped for.

Yes, it was a gibbon, or rather the remains of one—parts of its face, jaw, and arm. These fragments were enough for Turvey to show that the animal belonged to , distinct from the 20 that live today, and all the ones that we know of from prehistory. And it had been discovered in, of

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