The Guardian

What Europe could learn from the way Africa treats refugees | Alexander Betts

Africa hosts more refugees than any other region of the world and many countries are adopting pioneering solutions
NSONGA, UGANDA - APRIL 10: Refugees from Tchomia in the Democratic Republic of Congo arrive on boat at the Nsonga landing site on April 10, 2018 in Nsonga, Uganda. The perilous journey across Lake Albert from DRC to Uganda can take up to two days and has seen a number of Congolese die during the crossing. According to the UNHCR almost 70,000 people have arrived in Uganda from the Democratic Republic of Congo since the beginning of 2018 as they escape violence in the Ituri province. The majority of refugees are arriving by boat across Lake Albert, which lies between the two countries. With refugee settlements in Uganda almost at maximum capacity there are plans for new settlements to be built to deal with the continuing influx of people. A cholera outbreak in the settlements has left at least 42 dead and many hundreds severely affected. The World Food Programme anticipates providing food and nutrition for up to 1.6 million refugees this year. Fighting in DRC between the Hema and Lend...

Across Europe, asylum policies are failing both refugees and citizens. Attempts to negotiate a fair distribution of refugees within Europe are deadlocked, and this week’s emergency EU summit on migration seems unlikely to yield a breakthrough.

Just about the only thing that European governments have been able to agree upon is the creation of migration partnerships with African countries. These agreements focus on strengthening borders, reducing departures, and increasing the number of returns of migrants trying to cross to Europe. Niger has become Europe’s largest

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