NPR

Religion, The Supreme Court, And Why It Matters

With President Trump set to name the next justice to the high court soon, it's worth noting it was once dominated by Protestant Christians. Now, it is now more Jewish, Catholic and conservative.

Lots of controversial cases at the intersection of religion and the law wind up before the Supreme Court.

And, for most of U.S. history, the court, like the country, was dominated by Protestant Christians. But today, it is predominantly Catholic and Jewish.

It has become more conservative and is about to get even more so with President Trump's expected pick to replace Justice Anthony Kennedy, who is stepping down from the court at the end of July.

Everyone on President Trump's shortlist, but one, is Catholic. So what, if anything, do the current justices' and potential nominees' faiths tell us — and how has the religious make up of the Supreme Court changed?

"It's extraordinary and unprecedented in American history," said Louis Michael Seidman, a at Georgetown University, which is

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