NPR

Q&A: Wider Knowledge About Cancer Prevention Would Reduce U.S. Deaths

Cancer death rates remain high for some groups of people, including African-Americans, despite general gains made in recent decades. The American Cancer Society has ideas about reducing the gaps.
"Our health care systems need to adjust a little to try to get knowledge about cancer prevention to everybody," says Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society. Source: American Cancer Society

There has been a lot of progress in the fight against cancer. Cancer death rates have dropped, but the gains haven't been experienced equally.

Cancer death rates remain high for some minorities, including African-Americans. There are geographic differences, too. Death rates for breast and colorectal cancers have declined faster in New England than in other parts of the country. Cancer is also more likely to be fatal for people living in poverty or those without a college degree.

Dr. Otis Brawley, chief medical and scientific officer of the American Cancer Society, says many cancer deaths could be averted if these demographic gaps were narrowed. Hestarting Tuesday.

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