The Paris Review

Writers’ Fridges: Ottessa Moshfegh

In our series Writers’ Fridges, we bring you snapshots of the abyss that writers stare into most frequently: their refrigerators.

Do you see that half-eaten can of tuna on the top shelf? That was a mistake. Most of the food in my fridge is inedible. It would be inedible even if the stink of tuna hadn’t penetrated through it all, because it’s old. I’m almost never at home in Los Angeles, where this fridge lives. I travel a lot, and when I’m in California, I go to Luke’s house, two hours

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Paris Review

The Paris Review4 min read
Staff Picks: Ballet, Bob Dylan, and Black Smudges
Taffy Brodesser-Akner. Photo: Erik Tanner. The legendary profiler Taffy Brodesser-Akner’s debut novel, Fleishman Is in Trouble, lives up to the hype. In it, the hardworking hepatologist Toby Fleishman explores the world of dating apps after his estra
The Paris Review4 min read
Poetry Rx: Remember the Sky That You Were Born Under
In our column Poetry Rx, readers write in with a specific emotion, and our resident poets—Sarah Kay, Kaveh Akbar, and Claire Schwartz—take turns prescribing the perfect poems to match. This week, Kaveh Akbar is on the line. © Ellis Rosen Dear Poets,
The Paris Review10 min read
Translation As An Arithmetic Of Loss
More than half of my life has been lived in translation. I moved to America when I was eighteen, and although my mother tongue is Spanish, I am so fluent in English that I talk like a native speaker. When you live between languages, the conversion of