NPR

When Calling The Po-Po Is A No-No

In the past few months, several white people have been recorded calling police on black people who are going about their legitimate business: mowing the lawn, using the pool, and sleeping in the dorm.
Pedestrians walk outside the closed Spruce St. Starbucks store on May 29, 2018 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Source: Kena Betancur

Melissa DePino didn't take the infamous April video that showed two black men being handcuffed and ejected from a Philadelphia Starbucks—but she agreed to post it.

"I know these things happen," the writer says, "but I'd never actually witnessed it myself. And when I saw it I thought 'people need to see this.'"

So she uploaded and pressed "send." It got millions of views, and people are still talking about it.

Michelle Saahene was in the same Starbucks at the same time, and had been for a while. She, too, witnessed the arrest and thought something was janky. She'd heard

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