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How Artificial Intelligence Can Supercharge the Search for New Particles

Reprinted with permission from Quanta Magazine‘s Abstractions blog.

In the hunt for new fundamental particles, physicists have always had to make assumptions about how the particles will behave. New machine learning algorithms don’t. Image by ATLAS Experiment © 2018 CERN

he Large Hadron Collider (LHC) smashes a billion pairs of protons together each second. Occasionally the machine may rattle reality enough to have a few of those collisions generate something that’s never been seen before. But because these events are by their nature a surprise, physicists don’t know exactly what to look for. They worry that in, a particle physicist at New York University who works with the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

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