NPR

No Teen Lifeguard On Duty: Summer Jobs Are No Longer An Attraction

More teens have shifted away from typical summer jobs in recent years, opting to spend time with family instead, or take unpaid internships.
In Maine, a teenager serves ice cream at a Dairy Queen for the summer. But data shows teens' participation in the labor force is on the decline, and it has been for decades. Source: Jill Brady

Pedraam Faridjoo of Kensington, Md., is spending his summer volunteering and traveling. Ryan Abshire from Carmel, Ind., is using the time to be with his family. Meme Etheridge of St. Simons Island, Ga., is attending a music camp where she plays percussion.

What do they all have in common? They're teenagers, and they are not working summer jobs.

A summer job, like lifeguarding or scooping ice cream, used to be a rite of passage for teens. Thirty years ago, nearly two-thirds of U.S. teenagers worked summer jobs. Twenty years ago, more than half of them did.

Now, only a third of teens are in summer

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