Los Angeles Times

White supremacists turn away from public events

A year ago, white supremacists were ready for a big show of unity in Charlottesville, Va.

Hundreds traveled to the city for a rally in support of their belief that white people are superior. But the gathering quickly became violent, and an anti-racism protester was killed when a neo-Nazi man rammed a car into a crowd.

Since then, many supporters of "white rights" who frequently appeared on campus speaking tours or smaller gatherings throughout the country have become significantly less visible even as the number of neo-Nazi groups has increased, according to members of white supremacy groups, anti-racism activists and other observers.

The spectacle of Charlottesville has kept the far right movement more splintered than united, even as demonstrations such as one in Portland, Ore., on Saturday still

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