NPR

U.S. Sues Operators Of Pirate Texas Station Known As 'Alex Jones Radio'

The operators told the FCC they didn't recognize its right to regulate them. They were hit with a $15,000 penalty "for willful and repeated violation" of laws. Now the FCC has brought in the DOJ.
An antenna tower is seen at the Orchard Plaza apartment building in Austin in 2014, the year the FCC imposed a penalty on the building's owners for operating a pirate radio station. Source: Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

The U.S. government says the operators of a station considered the "flagship" radio outlet for conspiracy theorist Alex Jones must pay a $15,000 FCC penalty for broadcasting without a license. The station's operators have rejected the demand and accuse the Federal Communications Commission of "trying to run a bluff."

To collect the debt, the Justice Department recently filed a civil suit against Walter Olenick and M. Rae Nadler-Olenick, demanding the married couple pay the FCC's penalty "for willful and repeated violation" of U.S. law. They're accused of operating a pirate radio station; Texas Liberty Radio has been unlicensed at least since 2013, according to the

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