Bloomberg Businessweek

China Cleans Up Its (Trash) Act

Stricter rules on imported recycled goods have mainland businesses buying U.S. plants to get their waste
An assembly line at a Nine Dragons Paper plant in Dongguan, China

China’s Yunnan Xintongji Plastic Engineering Co. not long ago employed 180 people making construction pipes fashioned from the 3 million pounds of plastic trash it imported from the U.S. each year. Then in January, the Chinese government pulled the plug on lots of American junk and demanded exporters send only the cleanest plastic and paper waste, free of contaminants such as grease and broken glass. Without access to raw materials, XTJ had to lay off all but 30 of its workers and began running at 20 percent capacity.

So XTJ and its U.S. exporter,

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