The Atlantic

How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

The Nineteenth Amendment didn’t benefit only women, whom it gave the vote. A new study suggests it also contributed to kids staying in school longer.
Source: Associated Press

When the United States ratified the Nineteenth Amendment nearly a century ago, the law’s immediate impact extended far beyond giving women the right to vote. Women’s suffrage—widely as one of the 20th century’s most important events—coincided with of gender equality, , and among politicians to take a progressive stance on legislative proposals. that women’s suffrage also corresponded with a significant increase in municipal spending on charities and hospitals, as well as on social programs; one study by as much as 15 percent. A new study that another one of the ripple effects of women’s suffrage was that, across the board, children were more likely to stay in school.

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