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Goats Might Prefer A Smile To A Frown, Study Says

The goats in the study gravitated toward a photograph of a happy human face.
Alan McElligott, a professor of animal behavior, is eager to learn more about goat-human interactions. Source: Alan McElligott

As the editor of a blog called Goats and Soda (see this story for the explanation behind the name), I'm always interested in the latest goat research.

So I was definitely hooked by a press release that declared, "Goats prefer happy people."

Alan McElligott, an associate professor in animal behavior at the University of Roehampton in London, led the study. He wanted and can respond to human facial expression.

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