NPR

Françoise Hardy Remains France's National Treasure

Françoise Hardy is an immediately recognizable face who also possesses a poetic way with words — launching her to European super-stardom in the 1960s. At age 74, Hardy released her 28th album.
"It's one of the things which make me really happy, and if a musician offers me a beautiful melody I cannot resist," Françoise Hardy says. Source: Benoit Peverelli

Mick Jagger and David Bowie gushed over her. Bob Dylan composed a poem about her and refused to continue playing during one Paris concert unless she was in the audience and visited him backstage. Francoise Hardy is a 1960s French pop icon who more than 50 years later is still making music. At the age of 74, she's not slowing down yet. Hardy has released her 28th album. Hardy's latest work, Personne d'Autre, available now, is the artist's best-selling album yet, coming close to Gold status in France.

Hardy first burst onto France's music scene in 1962 with a song she wrote called "" ("All.

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