The Atlantic

The Rising French Star Creating Subversive Synth-Pop

On her new album, Christine and the Queens makes the gender revolution hummable.
Source: Suffo Monclao

As the number of prominent LGBTQ pop figures multiplies, what might have seemed like an uncontroversial hypothesis has been proven bountifully: There is not one “queer sound,” or even one “queer approach.” Certain radical dreamers might hope that singers who challenge social norms also challenge aesthetic ones, and you can indeed hear such rebellions in the of the electronic producer Sophie, the of Janelle Monáe, and the that is Frank Ocean. But the march of acceptance also allows for performers with unconventional identities to thrive with conventional sounds, as heard, for example, in the of Troye Sivan or the of Kim Petras.

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