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Supreme Court Turns Away Billionaire Who Wanted To Turn People Away From Calif. Beach

The lengthy case pitted surfers against a venture capitalist. On Monday, advocates for public access are hailing the court's decision to decline the case as a victory.
Vinod Khosla, a co-founder of Sun Microsystems, bought Martins Beach in 2008 for some $37 million. Source: Marcin Wichary/flickr

The Supreme Court has refused to take up a billionaire's appeal of a lower court ruling that forced him to maintain public access to surfers and others who visit Martins Beach, a scenic spot near Half Moon Bay, south of San Francisco.

The case had been shaping up to

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