NPR

Married Women May Be Moving Away From The GOP

The marriage gap has been a staple of American politics. For decades, married women have voted more Republican than unmarried women. But there's some signs that dynamic may be shifting.
Source: Nicole Xu for NPR

Christine Garcia, a 37-year-old stay-at-home mom, doesn't consider herself a particularly political person. But like a lot of women, she has strong opinions about President Trump.

"Maybe on the business side ... the money is better as far as I understand," said Garcia. "But a lot of the other things are very worrisome," she added with a laugh, as she pushed her daughter on a swing in a park in Birmingham, Mich., an affluent suburb of Detroit.

Garcia considers herself a fiscal conservative but a social liberal.

She wouldn't

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