The New York Times

Internet Hacking Is About to Get Much Worse

WE CAN NO LONGER LEAVE ONLINE SECURITY TO THE MARKET.

It’s no secret that computers are insecure. Stories like the recent Facebook hack, the Equifax hack and the hacking of government agencies are remarkable for how unremarkable they really are. They might make headlines for a few days, but they’re just the newsworthy tip of a very large iceberg.

The risks are about to get worse, because computers are being embedded into physical devices and will affect lives, not just our data. Security is not a problem the market will solve. The government needs to step in and regulate this increasingly dangerous space.

The primary reason computers are insecure is that most buyers aren’t willing to pay — in money, features or time to market — for security to be built into the products and services they want. As a result, we are stuck with hackable internet protocols, computers that are riddled

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