The Atlantic

How Much Would You Pay for a Prayer?

In India, thousands are embracing apps that allow them to pay for a ritual to be performed on their behalf.
Source: Rami Niemi

How can I get a divine intervention for my career? That’s the question Ravi Ganne, a young investment banker in Bangalore, typed into Google seven years ago. His search results led him to the website of a new company called ePuja. For about $15, the start-up would have a puja, a Hindu devotional-prayer ritual, performed on his behalf at one of its many in-network temples.

A few clicks

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic7 min readPolitics
Trump’s Fury at Don McGahn Is Misplaced
The former White House counsel helped stock the federal courts with conservative judges. Now multiple lawsuits involving Trump are headed there.
The Atlantic4 min read
Why So Many Sharks Have Bird Feathers in Their Bellies
Marcus Drymon wasn’t expecting a baby shark to barf up a ball of feathers onto his boat. The shark’s presence wasn’t the weird bit: Drymon and his team of fisheries ecologists regularly assess fish populations along the coasts of Mississippi and Alab
The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
Trump Was Right Not to Sign the Christchurch Call
The pledge to eliminate extremist content online is antithetical to the American understanding of free expression.