NPR

#MeToo Movement Gathers Force In India

A year after sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein catapulted #MeToo into a national movement in the U.S., women in India are using Facebook and Twitter to tell their stories.

Women in India are naming and shaming their abusers on social media — one year after sexual assault allegations against Harvey Weinstein catapulted #MeToo into a national movement in the U.S.

A little more than a week ago, harrowing survivor accounts and screenshots of lewd messages started flooding Twitter and Facebook. Among the dozens of men accused of sexual misconduct are senior journalists, Bollywood actors and a minister from the ruling party.

Some are calling it India's #MeToo movement.

It all started in late September, when Bollywood actress Tanushree Dutta spoke to Indian media about how she her inappropriately on the set of a movie they were shooting. Dutta is now pursuing legal action against Patekar, who has denied the allegations.

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