TIME

TAKING BACK THE VOTE

A woman votes on Nov. 8, 2016, in Durham, N.C.

When students at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, the largest historically black public college in the country, go to vote this fall, half of them will be voting in the state’s Sixth Congressional District and the other half will be voting in the 13th Congressional District.

If a student moves from one campus dorm to another, they could be forced to register to vote in a completely different congressional district.

Until 2016, the school’s predominantly African-American student body voted in the state’s 12th Congressional District. But after federal courts found that Republicans had illegally divvied up North Carolina’s congressional map by race—including in the 12th District—to help ensure that the party would have far greater power than its voter support would merit, Republican state legislators crafted

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from TIME

TIME2 min read
Conversation
WHAT YOU SAID ABOUT ... JUST SINGIN’ Readers differed on the April 8 cover story about special counsel Robert Mueller’s report. While some, like Elizabeth Hinesley of Delray Beach, Fla., saw the news as “validation” for President Trump, others thoug
TIME5 min read
In The Land Of Steady Habits, Biographer Robert Caro Prepares The Final LBJ Volume
THE DESK IN ROBERT CARO’S OFFICE HAS A rounded notch, a clean little half circle that lets him snug his wooden chair into his custom-made workstation. Instead of legs, the top rests on a pair of sawhorses. Shims raise the surface to where his elbows
TIME2 min read
A Man And A Baby, Lost In Space
FRENCH FILMMAKER CLAIRE DENIS IS one of the unsung geniuses of worldwide cinema. Not everyone knows her name, but the movies she’s made over the past three decades—like the sensuous, evocative 1999 Billy Budd adaptation Beau Travail, or 35 Shots of R