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'Oldest Intact Shipwreck Known To Mankind' Found In Depths Of Black Sea

The vessel dates back 2,400 years to the days of ancient Greece. "This will change our understanding of shipbuilding and seafaring in the ancient world," says archaeologist Jon Adams.
The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project says the intact shipwreck was discovered at a depth of more than one mile, where the scarcity of oxygen helped preserve the ancient vessel. Source: Black Sea MAP/EEF Expeditions

More than a mile beneath the surface of the Black Sea, shrouded in darkness, an ancient Greek ship sat for millennia unseen by human eyes — until the Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project happened upon its watery grave last year.

The team announced the find Tuesday, saying its discovery has been "confirmed

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