Apple Magazine

Twitter 2.0: SOCIAL NETWORK CUTS OFF THIRD-PARTY APPS

applemagbr180824_article_040_01_01
applemagbr180824_article_040_01_02

FLYING SOLO

It’s hard to imagine the internet without Twitter. Whether we’re following a breaking news story, tweeting along to our favorite television shows or watching celebrities argue over music, the social network is a major part of our everyday lives. Whilst Facebook and Instagram are for our friends and family, Twitter is our window to the world - to engage in debates, understand new perspectives and have real-time conversations with people from all walks of life.

Twitter was one of the first social networks to make its way to the iPhone with the release of iOS 2, but it was a third-party developer that created the app rather than the company itself. Indeed, Twitter has a history of being open source, and relying on developers to create software for its users, before swallowing up those software companies ( , and a social media analytics company). Indeed, Twitter acquired .

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from Apple Magazine

Apple Magazine1 min readScience
Britain To Intensify Fight Against Climate Change
Britain’s outgoing prime minister on Wednesday announced plans to eliminate the country’s net contribution to climate change by 2050. Theresa May said the plan will be put before Parliament later in the day. The amendment to the 2008 Climate Change A
Apple Magazine5 min readTech
WWDC 2019 PART 2: MAC INNOVATION AND A FIRST FOR THE iPAD
Last week, we looked at a number of key events from day one of WWDC 2019, Apple’s annual Worldwide Developers Conference. However, so much was revealed – even just on the first day – that we couldn’t possibly cover it all in a single article. In Part
Apple Magazine5 min readPsychology
Schools Reckon With Social Stress: ‘I’m On My Phone So Much’
High school biology teacher Kelly Chavis knew smartphones were a distraction in her class. But not even her students realized the psychological toll of their devices until an in-class experiment that, of course, was then spreading on social media. Fo