PCWorld

How to create and share custom Style Sheets in Microsoft Word and PowerPoint

Who knew Microsoft Word could give you a power rush? That’s what you feel when you create a one-click, customized Style Sheet that automatically applies font, paragraph, layout, and other settings to any document. It’s a great way to create consistency for monthly reports or other routine pieces of content. Once you get the hang of Style Sheets, formatting text one paragraph or section at a time will feel as primitive as Sumerians writing cuneiform on wet-clay tablets. Style Sheets also work in PowerPoint, and we’ll show you those as well.

In Word 2016, the process for creating styles and Style Sheets is similar to the processes in Word 2010 and 2013. Veterans will recognize most of the commands, and novices should catch on quickly, especially in the user-friendly Word 2016. The only real differences (aside from the aesthetics) are the location of these features on the menus, the addition of many new templates and themes that use Style Sheets, and some new options that make this feature more proficient and accessible.

CREATE A CUSTOM STYLE SHEET IN WORD

Imagine that you must create a weekly report for your branch of

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from PCWorld

PCWorld7 min read
LG G8 ThinQ: Gimmicks With A Capital ‘G’
It’s not enough for LG that the G8 ThinQ has the best processor, a great screen, an impressive battery, and a solid camera. Like nearly every G phone that came before, the G8 also has to be different, and that’s where it gets tripped up. Had LG focus
PCWorld3 min read
6 Android Q Features We Can’t Wait To Try (after The Dark Theme)
To celebrate the 10th major release of Android, Google has a present for all of us: a dark theme. After several starts and stops and half-efforts, Google is finally bringing full dark mode to all Android Q phones, and from what we’ve seen, it’s glori
PCWorld3 min read
Stop Your IPhone Videos From Turning Into A Blurry Mess On Android Phones (and Vice Versa)
Sadly, our friends don’t all have iPhones. That means some of our Messages chats are peppered with green bubbles and send over regular SMS instead of via Apple’s ultra-fast iMessage system. But it’s not just the color and speed that makes iMessage su