The Atlantic

Pushing Back the Darkness in Pittsburgh

On the first night of Hanukkah, I returned to the synagogue where my husband is a rabbi for the first time since the October shooting.
Source: Jeffrey Myers / AP

I was walking somewhere I was afraid to go, even though I had been there many times before. But I had not been to a religious service at the Tree of Life synagogue—where my husband is the rabbi of New Light Congregation—in more than 30 days, since a shooter killed 11 people in that spot.

Though it was not quite 6 o’clock on Sunday evening, the first night of Hanukkah, the winter darkness enveloped my neighborhood. I walked past the shopping district, the dry cleaners, my dentist’s office, and the home of my husband’s college roommate. All was familiar, yet I

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

More from The Atlantic

The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
Why Sri Lanka Was Probably Not Retaliation for Christchurch
Even if the retribution argument were consistent with prior ISIS doctrine, which it is not, the timing is off.
The Atlantic5 min read
How Sri Lanka’s Christians Became a Target
The island nation’s religious minority was rarely threatened. The Easter bombings changed that.
The Atlantic4 min readPolitics
Trump Refuses to Defend the United States
The president won’t take action to protect elections from foreign meddling, because he finds it politically and personally unpalatable.