The Atlantic

Ending Weed Prohibition Hasn’t Stopped Drug Crimes

Marijuana legalization was supposed to decrease crime—but the reality is more complicated.
Source: James Graham

Legalizing POT was supposed to reduce crime, or so advocates argued. The theory was simple: As cannabis buyers beat a path to the nearest dispensary, the black, and with it the industry’s criminal element. Indeed, a study recently published in found that after medical marijuana was legalized in California, .

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