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NIH hospital’s pipes harbored uncommon bacteria that infected patients

Three patients died in 2016 after being infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria living in the plumbing of the NIH Clinical Center.
NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Source: NIH

Patients were infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria living in the plumbing of the National Institutes of Health’s hospital in Bethesda, Md., contributing to at least three deaths in 2016.

A study in the New England Journal of Medicine found that, from 2006 to 2016, at least 12 patients at the NIH Clinical Center, which provides experimental therapies and hosts research trials, were infected with Sphingomonas koreensis,

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