The Christian Science Monitor

How a rugby union is helping young women get jobs and gain self-confidence

Irum Rathore continues to play rugby and dreams of furthering her career, even though not all her relatives are happy about her choices. Source: Maija Liuhto

At a rugby ground in Lahore, Pakistan’s second largest city, a group of young women dressed in green shirts that read “Pakistan rugby” are practicing tackling. They tumble to the ground, not afraid of getting hurt. These are not just any players: They belong to the national women’s rugby team of Pakistan, and recently they returned from Brunei, where they played in the Asian Sevens tournament.

Women in Pakistan are still often judged by society when they choose to take up sports. This is especially true when it comes to rugby, a contact sport that’s considered manly, even though it remains largely unknown in Pakistan, where cricket and hockey rule.

Few extracurricularsWorking to support herself

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