Foreign Policy Digital

Beijing’s Big, Bad Year

As the United States and China clashed over the trade war, the future of the People’s Republic looked grimmer—and more important—than ever.

Sticking to the official line became critical for political survival, as President Xi Jinping’s grip on power tightened and the space for free speech narrowed. In the western region of Xinjiang, over a million Uighurs were

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