The Guardian

You're going to fail your New Year's resolution – but it might not be your fault | Gideon Meyerowitz-Katz

Resolutions are not very effective – perhaps we could change society instead
‘People usually fail in their resolutions between two weeks and a month after making them.’ Photograph: Michelle Arnold/Getty Images/EyeEm

New Year’s Eve is a magical time. The old is about to end, the new is just on the cusp of beginning, and in this wonderful transition space we make promises about our lives ahead. Promises to lose weight, promises to study harder, promises to take up a gym membership and finally get fit.

We make a resolution to change our lives for the better.

And then, almost invariably, . Partly because it is hard

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