Nautilus

The Case Against Geniuses

The notion of genius as a capability a person can possess has come under attack recently in several ways.Pxhere / Public Domain

nce you’re called a “genius,” what’s left? Super genius? No, getting called a “genius” is the final accolade, the last laudatory label for anyone. At least that’s how several members of Mensa, an organization of those who’ve scored in the 98th percentile on an IQ test, see it. “I don’t look at myself as a genius,” LaRae Bakerink, a business consultant and a Mensa member, . “I think that’s because I see things

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