The Christian Science Monitor

How Rwanda's Catholic clinics struck a contraception compromise

The Roman Catholic health center that hugs the main road here announces its faith plainly.

ARCHDIOCESE OF KIGALI, reads the sign sprawled across the facade of the stout red brick building in this small town just outside Rwanda’s capital. Holographic portraits of Jesus and Mary stare down from the walls of every exam and consultation room, and nuns wander the corridors in full gray habits.

For decades, if you needed health care in this town, this was your option. And that included women looking for birth control – most forms of which the Catholic Church forbids. 

“That is our faith. We cannot change what we believe,” says

Difficult conversations'It's a calling'

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