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Norway Embarks On Its Most Ambitious Transport Project Yet

Norway's rugged west coast features glaciers, waterfalls and fjords that are beautiful — but take a long time to navigate. A major infrastructure plan could cut travel time in half.
The journey up the west coast of Norway, from the city of Kristiansand in the south to the city of Trondheim, now takes about 21 hours and requires seven ferry crossings. The Norwegian Public Roads Administration plans a nearly $40 billion transport project that would cut travel time in half. Source: Frank Langfitt

Norway's rugged west coast is home to glaciers, waterfalls and dozens of fjords that draw hordes of tourists each summer. But navigating the extreme topography of the region, which is home to a third of the country's population, isn't easy.

Driving the nearly 700 miles along the coastal route from the city of Kristiansand in the south to the city of Trondheim now takes about 21 hours and requires seven ferry crossings. To cut travel time in half, the Norwegian Public Roads Administration has launched a nearly $40 billion transportation project that will include the world's longest

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