NPR

If You're Often Angry Or Irritable, You May Be Depressed

Physicians have been taught to look for signs of hopelessness, sadness and lack of motivation to help them diagnose depression. But anger as a depression symptom is less often noticed or addressed.
Source: Ariel Davis for NPR

When registered nurse Ebony Monroe of Houston went through a period of being quick to anger about every little thing recently, she didn't realize what it might mean for her health.

"If you had told me in the beginning that my irritability was related to depression, I would probably be livid," Monroe says with a laugh. "I did not think irritability aligned with depression."

And she's not alone. Many people — including physicians — associate depression with feelings of hopelessness, sadness and a lack of motivation or concentration, but not anger. Some researchers say that's a problem, given that there appears to be a strong link between irritability

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