The Atlantic

A New Sign That Teens Know They Aren’t Struggling Alone

Their worries about mental health might have a bright side.
Source: Jeff Hutchens / Getty

In the past decade, young people in the United States have borne the brunt of some of the most highly publicized sources of stress. Mental illness is an enormous public-health concern for Americans of any age, but things such as anxiety over school shootings and the fallout of cyberbullying can make being young in this country uniquely difficult, on top of looming concerns such as college debt and building a career. Adolescents are seeing the emotional ramifications of these problems play out among their peers in huge numbers.

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