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Archaeologists Find Trove Of Maya Artifacts Dating Back 1,000 Years

The more than 200 artifacts were discovered in a previously sealed cave beneath the ancient Mexican city Chichén Itzá. Explorers had to crawl for hours to reach the archaeological materials.
Archaeologist Ana Celis checks out an artifact. Source: Courtesy of Karla Ortega

Mexican archaeologists announced last week that they discovered a trove of more than 200 Maya artifacts beneath the ancient city of Chichén Itzá in Mexico.

The discovery of the Yucatán Peninsula cave – and the artifacts, which appear to date back to 1,000 A.D. –.

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