Futurity

Younger kids with autism struggle with distractions

Before age 10, children with autism often find it tough to block out distractions, research confirms.
girl in classroom with papers over mouth

Before age 10, children with autism struggle with ability to block out visual distractions and focus on a specific task, research finds, and would benefit from intervention to address this.

Researchers saw in previous studies that younger children with autism had more difficulty with visual distractions when compared to their same-aged peers without autism. They didn’t see the impairment in older adolescents and adults with autism.

In the current study, researchers narrowed the age range and confirmed the earlier findings.

“Here is a cognitive difficulty that is more apparent during one age than another,” says Shawn Christ, an associate professor of psychological sciences in the University of Missouri College of Arts and Science.

“Now we can say there is a time period when these children may benefit from an intervention that focuses on accommodating or helping them overcome this difficulty. This could have a significant impact on their academic and social success. They may not need that same intervention later on in life.”

“…the difficulty is not with reading or math, it’s a difficulty with attention and inhibitory control, and there are ways to overcome that.”

For the study, which appears in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, researchers presented 80 adolescents, ages 11 to 20, with a visual filtering task. Participants had to respond as quickly as possible to a visual target while ignoring visual distractions close to the target’s location. Of the 80 participants in the study, 36 had autism.

“In our studies, we have observed differences in filtering ability between children with and without autism at younger ages such as 8-10 years old,” Christ says. “This is the time when kids are starting with more advanced topics in school, and can be a very difficult time for a child with filtering difficulties.

“It could be disrupting their ability to comprehend reading and affecting other kinds of skills, such as math. But the difficulty is not with reading or math, it’s a difficulty with attention and inhibitory control, and there are ways to overcome that.”

Researchers suggest simple interventions to help children overcome this difficulty such as using a reading window on a page that blocks the visual distraction of the other words, making a quiet room available at school to accomplish tasks, or minimizing visual distractions at home.

The University of Missouri Research Board, Autism Speaks, and the University of Missouri Thompson Center Scholar Program funded the work. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the funding agencies.

Source: University of Missouri

The post Younger kids with autism struggle with distractions appeared first on Futurity.

More from Futurity

Futurity3 min read
Why Elephants Munch More Acacia In Cool Weather
Temperature strongly affects the give-and-take relationship between acacia trees on the African savanna and their carnivorous ant protectors, research finds. New research shows that these ant-protected plants are much more vulnerable to becoming the
Futurity2 min read
Child Abuse Linked To Elder Abuse Of Chinese Americans
Chinese Americans abused as children and those who experienced intimate partner violence face an increased risk of abuse when they are elderly, according to a new study. Researchers surveyed 3,157 Chinese American adults over age 60 and found that th
Futurity2 min readScience
Video Captures T-cell ‘Training’ Program
For the first time, researchers have captured on video what happens when T-cells undergo a type of assassin-training program before they get unleashed in the body. T cells are the contract killers of the immune system, responsible for wiping out bact