Artist Profile

ANGELICA MESITI

IN YOUR MASTERS DISSERTATION FROM 2010, YOU spoke about how you feel most ‘at home’ with the moving image. When did you fall in love with this medium?

Like most things in life, I just fell into it. During my undergraduate study at what was then the College of Fine Arts (now UNSW Art and Design) I connected with time-based media because it encompassed some areas that I already had experience in – the performing arts.

There were so many areas to explore. I experimented a lot with sound-making and performance using 8-mm and 16-mm film and video. I’m not afraid of technology, I adapted really well to analogue and digital editing techniques and the technical side of making. I didn’t necessarily fall in love with the medium as much as I just started to hone a language that carried me forward.

You worked in the film industry for a while?

Yeah, I worked at Metro Screen in Paddington, which was an independent and community-based media organisation. There

I developed my technical and craft skills. Then I worked as an assistant on feature films – including an early short film with Warwick Thornton. But I always saw myself as a visual artist more than

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