The Christian Science Monitor

Lonely life in the middle for Britain’s newest political movement

Nursing a cup of Earl Grey tea, Joan Ryan glances at the TV monitor in her parliamentary office. It’s mid-afternoon on another long day of Brexit debate, and the chamber’s green leather benches are mostly empty, including the backbench whence Ms. Ryan has just returned after supporting an amendment calling for a second referendum to be held.

The amendment was the latest move in the three-dimensional chess game of Brexit – Britain’s fitful path out of the European Union – that is lurching forward again this week. Prime Minister Theresa May is seeking to build support for a twice-rejected Brexit withdrawal agreement ahead of an EU summit at which the United Kingdom will be

Finding a middle ground‘This is a long way from done’

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