NPR

'The Lost Gutenberg' Traces One Bible's 500-Year Journey

The depth of Margaret Leslie Davis' research on the tome's history cannot be understated — her writing is straightforward and, at times, heartbreaking, but outstanding reporting lies at the core.
An illustration depicting Johannes Gutenberg taking the first proof off his printing press. Source: Bettmann Archive

One of the first things I did when I moved to Austin a decade ago was visit the Gutenberg Bible housed in the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

As a bibliophile, the importance of that book was not lost on me. However, the impact of Johannes Gutenberg's surviving bibles as cultural treasures and book collectors' dreams was something I ignored. That is no longer the case. Margaret Leslie Davis' , which traces one Bible's 500-year journey, is an informative,

You're reading a preview, sign up to read more.

Related Interests

More from NPR

NPR2 min readPolitics
President Trump's Golf Scores Hacked On U.S. Golf Association Account
The awful scores of 101, 100, 108 and 102 were posted to Trump's USGA-administered handicap system on Friday, according to Golfweek.
NPR4 min read
Buckle Up For This 'Million Mile Road Trip'
We're trying not to make the "long, strange trip" joke about Rudy Rucker's new novel, but it's about three teens in a beat-up purple wagon with a dark energy motor, traveling across dimensions, so ...
NPR4 min read
How Vietnamese-Americans Took Over The Nails Business: A Documentary
If you got a manicure lately, chances are your nail salon was run by Vietnamese entrepreneurs. In Nailed It, director Adele Free Pham investigates how refugees built a multi-billion dollar industry.