The New York Times

How Much Should You Know About Your Therapist's Life?

IN TODAY’S WORLD, IT’S IMPOSSIBLE FOR ANY PROFESSIONAL TO BE A BLANK SLATE. MAYBE THAT’S NOT SUCH A BAD THING.

When I was starting out as a therapist, a colleague told me what was intended to be a cautionary tale. After suffering a series of miscarriages, she was in a Starbucks when her doctor called with the news that her pregnancy wasn’t viable. Standing at the counter, she burst into heaving sobs. A patient happened to walk in, saw her hysterically crying therapist, walked out the door, canceled her next appointment and never went back to her.

“You’re not going to keep writing now that you’re a

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